The highlight of the event was different age generations sharing symbolic mementos with younger generations. The 90s & 80s shared a picture of the memorial and the flag of Kenya to the 70S & 60S generation. The flag symbolized the fight for self-determination and the picture captured the reparation gesture that the memorial stands for.

 90s & 80S generation pass the Kenyan flag to 70s & 60s generation
90s & 80S generation pass the Kenyan flag to 70s & 60s generation

The 70s & 60s shared the Constitution of Kenya, with the 50s&40s; the Katiba symbolized the struggle for the second liberation and for the realization multipartism. The 50s&40s shared four reports i.e. Krigler, TJRC, CIPEV and Ndungu’s report on Historical Land Injustices. These are some of the important documents that detail what bedevils Kenya as a country yet their recommendations are yet to be implemented.

Generation 70s & 60s pass the Kenyan constitution to generation 50s & 40s
Generation 70s & 60s pass the Kenyan constitution to generation 50s & 40s

The 30s & 20s shared a whistle and a picture of a flash disk with the below 20s generation. These mementos signified the new space of online advocacy platforms  and the culture of whistle blowing.

Apart from the presence of the Maumau War Veterans Association, other liberation movements like Dini Ya Musambwa, Koitalel Arap Samoei and Mekatilili Wa Menza also attended the event. There was also representation from the civil society, donors and representatives from five universities and twenty five schools both primary and secondary.

Mzee Gitu Wa Kahengeri and Nick Hailey,British High Commissioner to Kenya
Mzee Gitu Wa Kahengeri and Nick Hailey,British High Commissioner to Kenya